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16

Here's the FAQ on how reputation works. The one-point cost is simply to discourage massive downvote campaigns. Honestly, you should ignore it... it's more worthwhile to both yourself and the community if you upvote good stuff and downvote bad stuff. If you're concerned about reputation, give good answers to questions over time. If you're not concerned about ...


7

Or would such unethical accumulation be detected by the system and intimate the higher moderators? Yes. This is vote fraud, and moderators have tools that alert us to this. In some cases, these votes may even be reversed automatically without moderator intervention, as described here. (The specific nature of these tools is kept private to avoid people ...


4

If you look at the edit history a substantial edit was made by the author of the answer 7 hours after it was originally made. In my opinion, the answer prior to the edit was worthy of a down vote. Similarly, the answer as it currently stands does not seems worthy of down votes, and probably deserves some up votes. If I remember the time line of the voting, I ...


2

Yes, reputation can be interpreted as a sort of currency: you earn some by asking and answering with quality. You can award bits of your reputation for bounties, or to draw more attention to a specific question. Since knowledge and science are cumulative, I understand why positive actions result in a reputation gain (or none), to encourage quality. However, ...


2

From the help center: As the author of the question, you have an additional option: accepting an answer that you believe is the best solution to your problem. To accept an answer: Choose one answer that you believe is the best solution to your problem. To mark an answer as accepted, click on the check mark beside the answer to ...


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