25

As a rule, suspensions are a private matter between the user that is suspended, the moderators, and the SE team. We don't give out information to other users, other than the brief canned message shown on the profile page of the suspended user. (And I wouldn't bother reading too much into that canned message; there are only a few and not all suspensions fit ...


16

Here's the FAQ on how reputation works. The one-point cost is simply to discourage massive downvote campaigns. Honestly, you should ignore it... it's more worthwhile to both yourself and the community if you upvote good stuff and downvote bad stuff. If you're concerned about reputation, give good answers to questions over time. If you're not concerned about ...


14

This a network-wide policy. It has been discussed (although not extensively) in some posts on the SE meta: Can the protect feature be made to block "101" users as well? Some explanations are available here: Undocumented change to reputation threshold for answering protected questions? The argument seems to be that at least one vote on the ...


12

This is intentional, the association bonus is ignored for the check. Users with 10 or more reputation can answer a protected question. However, the +100 account association bonus is ignored for this check, so you must have earned 10 or more reputation on that specific site to answer a protected question.


4

There is a series of scripts which Stack Exchange runs to try to find suspicious voting patterns. If they are in fact the same user, then this will be detected over time. For now, though, I would suspect that the two users at least definitely know each other, although from what I can tell this doesn't appear to be a sockpuppet situation.


3

No, upvotes received after you hit the reputation cap will not be applied the next day. From What is the daily reputation cap and how can I hit it?: The maximum amount of reputation you can earn in one day from upvotes and approved suggested edits is 200. Any upvotes you receive after reaching that number no longer award any points. You can still ...


2

Yes, reputation can be interpreted as a sort of currency: you earn some by asking and answering with quality. You can award bits of your reputation for bounties, or to draw more attention to a specific question. Since knowledge and science are cumulative, I understand why positive actions result in a reputation gain (or none), to encourage quality. However, ...


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