35

If the question is on-topic, and the OP chose to post here, I believe we should keep the question here, even if it is a better fit somewhere else. The one exception I can see is if the OP requests migration after becoming aware of that option.


23

Having just reviewed my supervisor's training on workplace harassment, I have strong opinions on this question. Short version: it can have a simple and definitive answer, and should be edited and re-opened This is not really an Academia question, but a general question about professionalism in the workplace. As such, one might argue that it should be ...


22

General The answers to many problems depend on individual factors to some extent and you (or the reader) has to be the final judge whether an answer really applies to their problem. This is inevitable and not a problem per se. However, if we expect potential answers to be dominated by such individual factors, we put the question on hold. There are two main ...


21

My two cents.... To the title question: yes, absolutely. When in doubt, we should try to accept questions, not try to close them. There are many a number of Nobel prizes, some of which are only very tenuously related to Academia. Similarly, there are many areas of Academia for which there is no Nobel prize. Physics, economics, literature, medicine, and ...


19

What exactly is a shopping question? A shopping question is a question that appears to seek help choosing, finding or assessing an individual journal, an individual publisher, an individual university, an individual academic program, an individual field, an individual research topic, an individual funding agency, a commercial online service, or similar, but ...


16

I don't know about others, but the way in which I have approached this question is to think about which issue is the most salient for any attempt to fix the question. Close votes put a question on hold, at which point the asker is encouraged to try to repair the question if possible. Thus, if the question has multiple problems with it, I try to select the ...


14

I believe the linked question (and other similar questions) is on-topic and if it is not, then it should be. I do not see why we would consider "How to improve oneself as a teacher" or pedagogical / classroom management issues and we would not consider "how to research" or research management issues. My vote is to keep the linked question and support these ...


14

I think that this is a good faith question which we should attempt to give a good faith answer to, and I like several of the answers which were given before it was closed. It could also go on workplace or IPS, but I do think academic norms are different enough that it would do well here. There are a number of academics who don't see how what, from their ...


14

They should be on-topic. At the end of the day we exclude questions about the content of research because academics in general (i.e., the community of this site) are not interested in such questions or able to evaluate answers to them – this is better done by subject experts who most often have their own sites. Also these sites taken together receive far ...


13

Yes, questions about peer-review or dealing with flawed published papers are very on-topic. So, you could very well ask questions along the lines of the following: I am peer-reviewing a paper with serious but not obvious flaws; how can I avoid that the authors just take it to another journal, when I reject it? I am afraid that the answer will boil down ...


13

There are three main paths by which a question can be deleted. Flags: If a question receives enough spam or abusive flags, the community bot will automatically delete the question and feed the spam/abusive detection algorithms. While this question is not spam, the abusive flag can be used for trolling. The question has only received a single abusive flag, ...


12

I think the question shows utter incompetence as a lecturer, but it's a valid question and should not be removed because I've had lecturers who were actually this socially incompetent, and as such it's a legitimate question. Hopefully someone will learn from some of the excellent answers it's attracting.


12

Converted from a comment on the main site question (which I now have deleted): I am European so I probably know very little about this movement and the controversies that surround it, but I am strongly against the deletion of this question. In my view, merely discussing a topic in a civil way should never be censored because someone finds it offensive.


12

I voted to close the coffee question because: It is not specific to academia and in fact none of the answers found an academia-specific angle to answer that question. All the ethical considerations can be equally translated to other contexts. Apart from the title, the question is essentially a poll, which are not a good fit for Stack Exchange in general: ...


12

Additional clarity is always good. However, we should make sure that we revisit this from time to time—someone may always try to come back and say: "But it's not on the list!"


11

Certainly, random Internet users should not be considered authoritative on legal matters. People needing legal advice for a specific situation should consult a lawyer. The tag excerpt for legal-issues says as much: Note that Academia.SE, like any SE site, cannot offer specific legal advice; consult a lawyer for such questions. On the other hand, SE sites ...


11

I think that as a community we are a bit fast on the trigger for migration, and basically agree with earthling's post. I would add that the distinction I find useful is whether the question's answers will need to be highly technical vs. more about custom and practice. Thus, for example, in the two examples that you give, I think the "p-value" question is ...


11

I strongly agree with your conclusion, though hadn't been able to phrase it so well. Undergraduate breadth requirements have very little to do with graduate school. In addition, the strength and particulars of their enforcement is also very institution-dependent, which also makes it a poor question for this site.


10

I think that the "practical answerable questions" line should be interpreted quite permissively. I think that its real value is to permit closing of questions that are basically silly wastes of time because they aren't even vaguely close to the real world, e.g., What would happen if PhD programs required students to switch what professor they were ...


10

Historically, this community has had a strong policy of staying away from assessments of (most) specific organizations, commercial or otherwise. I believe that this is a good policy for several reasons: Assessments are often highly relative and based on perspective There is a temptation for advocacy, whether for personal ("Go Tech! Beat State!") or ...


10

To repeat my comment here: awards are on-topic. We even have an awards tag. If awards are on-topic in general, major awards like the Nobel prize surely are on-topic as well. Regarding the individual points raised in the meta question about why the Nobel prize should be treated differently: there are many Nobel prizes that are "related to academia"....


9

It's certain that dealing with misconduct by undergraduates is very much a part of the academia experience, for grad students as well as faculty. I see that when a faculty member comes and ask: "A student did (misconduct), can you advise me on how to respond?" then as long as it is not too narrowly applicable a situation, then it seems to clearly be within ...


9

In general, I think an on-topic question on this site should at least have a significant component which can be answered by those with expertise in academia. While abstractly it need not be so, in reality this site is populated by a relatively temporary community of questioners and a relatively permanent community of answerers (I would like it better if ...


9

Not off topic at all, but you could also ask at expats.se.


9

You might have a too much idealized view of the lab activity. I work in an experimental field related to physics and I visited several laboratories around the world: there's really no uniform way of keeping track of lab experiments, even within the same lab. In large experiments like those run by particle physicists there are probably standard practices, but ...


9

As a general rule, the best way to make a question a good fit is to ensure the question could be asked by someone else not in your exact situation. Asking about very specific details of policy manuals is probably not a good idea, but if the question could be expanded to cover different agencies or cover different research areas, then it’s usually OK. But ...


8

I routinely see graduate students in my own university study, cheat on exams and homework, submit plagiarized homework, get upset because others are cheating, dispute grades, complain that a class is badly organized, and all the other things we accuse "undergrads" of doing. Therefore, I believe questions about conduct in university-level coursework should ...


8

I disagree with the assertion that this is a "style" question. The precision of numbers and measurements is a vital part of the practice of statistics, and really belongs on a site like Cross Validated rather than on Academia.


8

As I've said here, I believe it is much more useful to characterize a publisher (or conference, university, etc) than ask about it by name. Consider the question "Is a university that grants me a PhD for $1000 and a copy of my unpublished book fake?", which has a great, general answer that someone put some non-trivial effort into. There are dozens of ...


7

Here is how I tend to think about it: The process of research is anything that is primarily about scientists and their interactions (including systems for supporting those interactions) The content of research is anything that is primarily about the artifacts under examination and the mechanisms used for examining them. From that perspective, I would ...


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