17

We definitely should be nice to new users. This includes welcoming them and explaining what can be improved about their questions and answers. As for not down voting them, large negative scores, especially in the absence of close votes, have little positive influence and a pretty big negative influence. That said, it is worth noting that questions with a ...


16

Here's the FAQ on how reputation works. The one-point cost is simply to discourage massive downvote campaigns. Honestly, you should ignore it... it's more worthwhile to both yourself and the community if you upvote good stuff and downvote bad stuff. If you're concerned about reputation, give good answers to questions over time. If you're not concerned about ...


12

The highly-rated question you linked was created as a community wiki as a way to close numerous related questions as duplicates, since these types of questions are quite common here. As such, it includes an answer to a question that would ordinarily be far too broad to be accepted. See this meta discussion. Had that question not been created as a community ...


8

The system is smart enough to tell when this sort of thing happens. Those should be reverted overnight.


8

There are limited rules regarding how users can use their votes. The only constraints I can think of are that the system prevents, or at least tries to prevent, systematic down voting of a user and sock puppet accounts. This means that if a user can down vote whatever they want for whatever reason they want and there is nothing the mods can do about it. Any "...


7

As in every StackExchange site, the rules are pretty simple. You should downvote bad questions. You could read this blog post by Jon Skeet referring to this issue (it's a bit more focused on programming, but the general rules apply everywhere). If you downvote a question because the user who asked has done something reprehensible, this is not desirable in ...


5

I am a newcomer and that post was mine. When I find the website for the first time. It made the best first impression on me. I thought that was a great way to ask questions in a friendly manner. I did not want to hurt anyone or waste your time. I am just a newcomer. on that post, I mentioned that I am not a native speaker, instead of giving me a piece of ...


4

If you look at the edit history a substantial edit was made by the author of the answer 7 hours after it was originally made. In my opinion, the answer prior to the edit was worthy of a down vote. Similarly, the answer as it currently stands does not seems worthy of down votes, and probably deserves some up votes. If I remember the time line of the voting, I ...


4

This question and this answer are my way of trying to encourage more of this sort of thing. Posters with sufficient reputation could, as well as being nice, be a little more vigorous in casting down votes for obviously bad questions; casting close votes for closable questions; and in the list of closed non-duplicate questions, either voting to delete, or ...


3

The thing that is fundamentally with your question about the UK is the same thing that is fundamentally wrong with the one about the US. The questions are both too broad and too narrow at the same time. The admissions process in both countries is a huge topic with books and books written about it. At the same time a good answer depends on the individual ...


2

I don't know about the UK system, but as I gather from the comments below your question, there might not be a sufficiently uniform admission process there, and there may be not specific advice that can be given for weak students. For instance, if you asked the same question about my country (Italy), I'd have voted to close too, because there are probably as ...


2

Yes, reputation can be interpreted as a sort of currency: you earn some by asking and answering with quality. You can award bits of your reputation for bounties, or to draw more attention to a specific question. Since knowledge and science are cumulative, I understand why positive actions result in a reputation gain (or none), to encourage quality. However, ...


1

I understand that in the current system, votes on questions and answers are both a way for higher reputation and then more privileges, and a way to punish the poster for any other reason. Probably there should be a punishment (down-vote) mechanism (other than flags) independent of the question/answer votes (e.g., in the user profile page). If the ...


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