15

My take, from what I've seen so far, is that most things to do with classes and general struggles with learning seem to apply equally well to graduate and undergraduate. I suppose that 'undergraduate-only' is a good filter for not having to deal with questions about undergraduate admissions, or about all of the folderol that is often very important for ...


14

I don't see any reason why they should not be permitted, and judged by the same measure as all questions. If they are a good fit for the site (which probably requires that they be realistic), they add value and should be allowed! Moreover, I don't think you can prevent them efficiently. There's no way you can tell, when I ask a question, whether it's really ...


9

I actually like that there's a no undergraduate-only rule, despite often protesting it's (imo) misapplication. My reasoning, such as it is: There are some thing that, while generally applying to undergraduates, are very specific to undergraduates, and don't so much apply to the rest of the academic landscape. Because of the nature of most academic systems, ...


6

The problem here is the sequence. It's not at all clear to me that the answers are being taken to heart at all: one piece of evidence is that not one of the questions has an accepted answer. Just because the OP doesn't take the answers to heart doesn't mean other people with dysfunctional relationships with their advisor won't. That is why we don't like ...


5

I think a subtly changing the question from what "CAN" be done to what "IS" being done might make it less "discussion" oriented without changing the meaning too much.


5

For better or for worse, the nature of the StackExchange platform explicitly discourages that sort of interaction. The "SE way", if there is one, is to provide answers to well-formulated, generalizable questions. User-to-user communication is not only discouraged, it's simply not even possible on the website. Within that framework, I would suggest that the ...


5

I might be a nice idea to make a faq-like list of such questions, is that a good idea? In theory, the collected set of questions asked by people on this site is expected to evolve into such a collection over time. Thus, if you search netherlands, it should effectively give you a FAQ. "Let's talk about education in the Netherlands" is an unanswerable open-...


4

The specific question you described in a comment, Why Researchgate have bad reputation according to members of this site? sounds like it would be closed as an opinion-based question - it's basically an invitation for others to share opinions, which is off topic here as described in the help center. Besides, existing questions like ResearchGate: an asset ...


3

A general comparison between admission processes in two countries might or might not be on-topic, depending on the nature of the question. For example, we have a question on the general process of admissions in the US. A question on how to compare the admission processes of specific universities (e.g., UT Austin vs. TU Delft) would definitely be off-...


3

I think in general those types of questions are fine. Just make sure you split things up into manageable pieces and do not get too focused on your details.


3

No, this is not the right place for such a question. From the help center: Can I ask questions about my specific situation? You should not ask "a question that will help only me," but rather "a question that will help people like me." If your question is so limited as to be useful only to you, consider broadening the scope so others can learn from ...


2

It needs some cleaning up, but there's a valid question buried in there. I think we could take the question, but it would have to be worked on a bit before we'd open it for response.


2

No, they are really not a good fit to the site at all. The reason is, that however good your imagination is, there may be crucial details that would relate to a real-life situation, that you just haven't anticipated. That makes the answers much less useful to anyone with a real-world problem that looks broadly like what you made up. The Help Cente ...


2

My feeling (mentioned in comments) is that the second part of the question (asking for references to work studying this issue) is legitimate and concrete. The first part involves discussion and so is not well suited. This also eliminates the need to discuss "why" one should care about the issue - I personally think that's troll bait, but there's no point ...


2

In this particular case, the user in question would appear to be just using academia.SE as their personal blogsite to rant about their supervisor (and now, it would seem, to try to find reasons to get them dismissed). At some point, the moderators' tolerance will run out, and the user will get suspended. Given that the moderators here are more active and ...


2

There is a similar question about a short-term visit to the U.S. that seems to be well-received: What's the etiquette for a short visit to a US university department? In May, I'll be visiting a department at Columbia University in the US for a few days. What's the etiquette on visiting (answers relevant to US in general are welcome, to prevent this ...


2

The questions you have listed are indeed not shopping questions. However, they are still not appropriate for the site, because they fall under the "too specific" category. If we allow such questions for an arbitrary journal X, then we have to allow similar questions for every journal. We don't want to have the site flooded with such questions, so this would ...


2

We have already a bunch of questions and answers about ResearchGate. So, if you have a new question, you can probably go on and ask. Be sure, however, that your question can be answered by the usual bunch of strangers on the Internet, who are just users of that service and for which certain details of its workings are totally unaccessible.


2

I do not see anything that would make your first question (“Is this common practice among editors and/or journals?”) closeworthy. However, I suggest to clearly state that you want answers that are at least somewhat based on first-hand experience (i.e., by editors of such journals or people obtaining trustworthy information from editors). Otherwise, I ...


2

tl;dr: While you may dispute the closure of individual questions on the grounds of "primarily opinion-based" (some people will even disagree with the examples I gave in this post!), I think this close reason is useful and has a valid place here. I don't think we should - or do, generally - close questions based only on the fact that answers will be ...


1

I believe that this would be an appropriate question to ask (with a little bit of refinement): Is there a way to quantify the amount of research being done for a given field of study? The answer, of course, may not be too useful. The answer is essentially: yes, lots of them, and none of them are any good. It's much like the question of how to compare ...


1

In addition to what Aeismail said, if the answers to the first three questions aren’t available on the journal’s website, they are very difficult to obtain (unless you work for the respective journal). Therefore most of such answers are either very easy to answer or very unlikely to ever be answered.


1

With my mod hat on I do what the AC.SE community wants, but personally I don't like lists. I especially don't like lists that are not obviously useful to a large number of people and will have people interested in maintaining the list. That said, for this particular case, I wonder if there is a relevant non-list question. For example, the UK uses the ...


1

My impression nowadays is that we don't really need the undergraduate closing reason as such. Most questions that are closed for being "undergraduate-only" could also fall under the "too specific" label.


1

Unfortunately, we're a Q&A site, not a mentoring site or a counseling site or a support group. If an individual user wants to help this poster in his or her particular situation overall, then I think that an individual should be welcome to do so (and to mention it in answers as appropriate) but I don't know if there should be some kind of site-wide ...


1

I don't know if there really is a "universal conversion" available. Besides, there is also this Wikipedia reference on grading schemes in different nations. I don't think we need to reinvent the wheel.


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