3 replaced http://academia.stackexchange.com/ with https://academia.stackexchange.com/
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For example:

These questions are about extraordinary stories (which are thus likely to attract viewers and votes) that are at least on the edge of plausibilty. In both example cases, there are some details which are fishy and leave the impression that the asker is not really as familiar with academia as they claim to be.

Now the help centerhelp center states:

You should only ask practical […] questions based on actual problems that you face.

which would make these questions officially closeworthy, if the situations are indeed made up. Also, as these questions are naturally attracting a considerable amount of votes and views, they could be part of a scheme to game the system. On the other hand, it’s impossible to determine with high confidence whether these situations are really made up.

Thus I ask:

  • What should we do about such questions?
  • If we should close them, what is a good way to determine the plausibility threshold?

For example:

These questions are about extraordinary stories (which are thus likely to attract viewers and votes) that are at least on the edge of plausibilty. In both example cases, there are some details which are fishy and leave the impression that the asker is not really as familiar with academia as they claim to be.

Now the help center states:

You should only ask practical […] questions based on actual problems that you face.

which would make these questions officially closeworthy, if the situations are indeed made up. Also, as these questions are naturally attracting a considerable amount of votes and views, they could be part of a scheme to game the system. On the other hand, it’s impossible to determine with high confidence whether these situations are really made up.

Thus I ask:

  • What should we do about such questions?
  • If we should close them, what is a good way to determine the plausibility threshold?

For example:

These questions are about extraordinary stories (which are thus likely to attract viewers and votes) that are at least on the edge of plausibilty. In both example cases, there are some details which are fishy and leave the impression that the asker is not really as familiar with academia as they claim to be.

Now the help center states:

You should only ask practical […] questions based on actual problems that you face.

which would make these questions officially closeworthy, if the situations are indeed made up. Also, as these questions are naturally attracting a considerable amount of votes and views, they could be part of a scheme to game the system. On the other hand, it’s impossible to determine with high confidence whether these situations are really made up.

Thus I ask:

  • What should we do about such questions?
  • If we should close them, what is a good way to determine the plausibility threshold?
    Tweeted twitter.com/StackAcademia/status/673385080971272193
2 added 6 characters in body
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For example:

These questions are about extraordinary stories (which are thus likely to attract viewers and votes) that are at least on the edge of plausibilty. In both example cases, there are some details which are fishy and leave the impression that the asker is not really as familiar with academia as they claim to be.

Now the help center states:

You should only ask practical […] questions based on actual problems that you face.

which would make these questions officially closeworthy, if the situations are indeed made up. Also, as these questions are naturally attracting a considerable amount of votes and views, they could be part of a scheme to game the system. On the other hand, it’s impossible to determine with certaintyhigh confidence whether these situations are really made up.

Thus I ask:

  • What should we do about such questions?
  • If we should close them, what is a good way to determine the plausibility threshold?

For example:

These questions are about extraordinary stories (which are thus likely to attract viewers and votes) that are at least on the edge of plausibilty. In both example cases, there are some details which are fishy and leave the impression that the asker is not really as familiar with academia as they claim to be.

Now the help center states:

You should only ask practical […] questions based on actual problems that you face.

which would make these questions officially closeworthy, if the situations are indeed made up. Also, as these questions are naturally attracting a considerable amount of votes and views, they could be part of a scheme to game the system. On the other hand, it’s impossible to determine with certainty whether these situations are really made up.

Thus I ask:

  • What should we do about such questions?
  • If we should close them, what is a good way to determine the plausibility threshold?

For example:

These questions are about extraordinary stories (which are thus likely to attract viewers and votes) that are at least on the edge of plausibilty. In both example cases, there are some details which are fishy and leave the impression that the asker is not really as familiar with academia as they claim to be.

Now the help center states:

You should only ask practical […] questions based on actual problems that you face.

which would make these questions officially closeworthy, if the situations are indeed made up. Also, as these questions are naturally attracting a considerable amount of votes and views, they could be part of a scheme to game the system. On the other hand, it’s impossible to determine with high confidence whether these situations are really made up.

Thus I ask:

  • What should we do about such questions?
  • If we should close them, what is a good way to determine the plausibility threshold?
1
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What to do with questions that are likely to be made-up click bait?

For example:

These questions are about extraordinary stories (which are thus likely to attract viewers and votes) that are at least on the edge of plausibilty. In both example cases, there are some details which are fishy and leave the impression that the asker is not really as familiar with academia as they claim to be.

Now the help center states:

You should only ask practical […] questions based on actual problems that you face.

which would make these questions officially closeworthy, if the situations are indeed made up. Also, as these questions are naturally attracting a considerable amount of votes and views, they could be part of a scheme to game the system. On the other hand, it’s impossible to determine with certainty whether these situations are really made up.

Thus I ask:

  • What should we do about such questions?
  • If we should close them, what is a good way to determine the plausibility threshold?